PAST EXHIBITIONS

AND EVENTS

Georgina Vinsun and Tess Williams 2013 - "The Curtain Call"

"The Curtain Call"

“The Curtain Call” exhibition featuring exciting artwork by the abstract artists Georgina Vinsun and Tess Williams,
will run until 20th June.

We will be pre-selling the artwork due to demand so
please contact us for private appointments or to view
images prior to the event.

 

Box Galleries @ Studio 106 Art Gallery

Damien Hirst, Dan Baldwin and Russell Young 2013 - "A Curious Collection"

"A Curious Collection"

 

“A Curious Collection” Damien Hirst, Dan Baldwin and Russell Young

Box Galleries@ Studio 106 Art Gallery

Jenny Leach and Jan Malaszek 2013 - Recent works & Garden Suite

Recent works & Garden Suite

Jenny Leach and Jan Malaszek

Studio106 Art Gallery is delighted to announce a joint exhibition with
the recent work from Jenny Leach and Jan Malaszek, two London
based professional artists and teachers.

When: April 24 – May 5, 2013
Where: Studio 106 Art Gallery, 106 Dawes Road, London SW6 7EG
Private view: Wednesday April 24, 6.30 – 9.30pm and Sunday April 28, 2.30 – 5.30pm
Artists in conversation with Rob Dark and Andrzej Maria Borkowski:
Monday April 29, 6.30 – 8.30pm

http://www.artweek.com/art-events/jenny-leach-and-jan-malaszek-exhibition

 

David Pilgrim 2013 - Solo Show

Solo Show

David Pilgrim@studio106artgallery.

Box Galleries are delighted to invite you to
the UK’s leading artist David Pilgrim’s solo show.
The private viewing will be held on THURSDAY 28TH
MARCH 6.30-9.30pm, where David will be in
attendance showcasing his breathtaking new collection
of cityscapes. These include originals of Venice, London
and New York. MOre about the artist on Box Galleries Website. The exhibition will run until 5th April.

 

Elisa Cantarelli 2013

Solo Show

 

From the 15th March 2013 Box Galleries & de Freitas Fine Art will be having an exhibition with world renowned artist Elisa Cantarelli. We would like to invite you to the

EXCLUSIVE Private View on 14th March 6.30-9.30pm @ Studio106Art Gallery

Exclusive Opening Exhibition 2013

Collaboration

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery, Box Galleries and de Freitas Art like to invite you to Exclusive Opening Exhibition. Opening Exhibition is a Group collection of up and coming artists.

Studio 106 Art Gallery is delighted to announce that from 27th January it is going to work collaboratively with Box Galleries and de Freitas Fine Art. The Gallery will be hosting a number of solo shows and group exhibitions of artist represented and curated by the two galleries and will be offering home/office visits with the artwork.

Click on the photo for more…

NATASHA DELIC exhibition Narrativity Through Lithography - 2nd – 11th November 2012

NARRATIVITY THROUGH LITHOGRAPHY - NATASHA DELIC

Private View: Thu 1th November 6.30 – 8.30pm

2nd – 11th November 2012

Meet the artist: Sun 4th November 5 – 7pm

Closing Event: Sun 11th November 11.30am – 4pm

Gallery Open: Thu – Sat 12 – 7pm and Sun 4th – 11th Nov

 

Natasha’s inspiration and chosen themes are drawn from nature, poetry and ancestry. Through the use of black & white lithography, the art form is more convincing and has a greater credibility, conveying a timeless feeling.

 

“Nature has its own peace and harmony, working in cycles. I have strived to reflect this balance through my work, whether the subject matter is a tree or a person. For me the presence of the immediate environment combined with my inner feelings are the most important elements in shaping the imaginative lithographic lines and forms” sais Natasha.

 

“The main themes in Natasha’s work can be competed to poetry. From people in landscapes and imaginative portraits, to those of nature and ancestors. She takes a small fragment of reality like in poem and meditates on it” Dr Olga Smirnova.

 

In Narrativity Through Lithography Natasha is telling the story about the journeys which we take and somehow they unpredictably become part of one’s life. It is through the stories that we would be able to experience these journeys fully. After many years spent working in publishing, Natasha found her way back to her art and felt the need to tell her story to a wider audience.

 

Natasha Delic was born in Belgrade, Serbia. She lives and works in London, and has MA in Publishing, Oxford Brooks University. During her studies at The Royal Academy of Fine Art, The Hague, Holland, Natasha was exposed to wide ranging artistic styles and it was through lithography that Natasha found the best and most natural way in expressing her chosen subjects and themes. By only her third year at the Academy, Natasha held her first exhibition and already formed her own style of lithographic prints. Today her work can be found in private collections around the world. She exhibited widely, her passed exhibition include Spui Theatre, The Hague, Masashino Bijyutsu Gakuen,Tokyo, Burgermeister Muller Museum Solhofen, Germany TCM Asser Institute, The Hague, Gallery Kunst Kring, The Hague, The Gallery, Notting Hill, London

 

 

 

Royal Marsden Hospital, Chelsea, London

ROYAL MARSDEN HOSPITAL, CHELSEA, LONDON

Nick says of his paintings,

 

“ The work is about paint and surface, warmth and light, but mostly it’s about a sense of being. Being at one with the natural world I try to find the coloures that will fit my sensation.

I am obsessed with colours and the physicality of paint.

 

Colour tastes, colour textures, colour perfumes and colour sounds. Colour can exercise enormous influence upon the body; and the soul.

My subjects are simple, and yet are the life forces of our existence on this little planet.

Sunlight, Precipitation & Vegetation.”

 

Coming from a creative family Nick remembers ”colouring in” alongside his watercolorist grandmother Norah Vivian.

After studying at the West Sussex College of Art 1967-1971 Nick came to live and work in

London as a Graphic Designer with various studio/agencies until in 1977 he joined two

other artists to set up The Daylight Studio.

The studio specialised in producing hand painted/printed roller blinds for leading designers

and high street outlets like John Lewis. Also at this time Nick started to produce custom

murals for large private households in London and abroad 1977-1981.

In 1982 Nick set up his own studio, designing and painting murals, trompe l’oeil and decorative paintings for prestigious clientele including stars and royalty. Nick travelled the world, sometimes providing and directing teams of as many as a dozen artists on some projects.

 Today, whilst still enjoying mural painting, Nick is concentrating more on his canvas painting from his studio in Wimbledon, London.

 

Putney School of Art and Design 2012 Diploma Show - 3rd – 14th July 2012 - EIGHT ARTISTS — FOUR CENTURIES — ONE SHOW

EIGHT ARTISTS — FOUR CENTURIES — ONE SHOW

EIGHT ARTISTS — FOUR CENTURIES — ONE SHOW

3rd – 14th July 2012

 

Private View: Wednesday 4th July 6.30 – 8.30pm

Meet the artist: 5th &12th July 4 – 6pm

Closing Event : 12th 6.30 – 8.30pm

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery is delighted to announce an exhibition by artists from Putney School of Art and Design. The show is suitably titled 481/8 after the eight exhibiting students and their four hundred and eighty one years combined experience. This is the first time that the annual exhibition has been held at Studio 106 Art Gallery and it will provide an exciting platform for the Putney graduates.

 

Visitors to the exhibition will have the opportunity to see an eclectic mix of creative ideas, styles and techniques with ceramics, etchings, experimental media, and oils among the works on show. The eight artists represented in the exhibition are – RosieCopeland, Debbie Flatt, Clare Frankl, Margaret Gettens, Zohreh Paykani, Pat Rhodes, Chrissie Soames and Sally Shillito.

 

Diploma Course director, Jan Malaszek comments -

“This promises to be an accomplished and thought-provoking show and represents the culmination of a two year fine art course during which the students have gradually developed their own artistic personalities and are ready to step forward into the limelight of their first group exhibition.”

 

Artist Statements

 

Rosie Copeland has lived in London for nearly 20 years.  However, in this exhibition Rosie has returned to her roots with the views and landscapes around her childhood home in Oxfordshire providing the inspiration for her work.  Memories, an emotional and physical attachment to place and the passage of time are themes she explores in her paintings.

 

Debbie Flatt has been painting and working in experimental media for many years, exhibiting and selling works on paper.  Since finishing work as a psychotherapist two years ago she has had the freedom to develop her work and ideas through the Diploma course and the opportunity to focus on etching.

 

Clare Frankl has recently moved from running her own architectural practice back to her first love, ceramics.  Triggered by an increasing desire to have a hand-on engagement with the stuff of making, her work seeks to use memory, strengths and vulnerabilities of clay to embody ideas of place and displacement through linked groups of vessels.

 

Margaret Gettens brings a passion for colour and light to her work centred on the erosion of the North Norfolk coastline and the tenuous relationship between man and nature.  The works are a tribute to her father who died in Norfolk last summer and reflect his love of sea and countryside.  Margaret will continue her studies after the Diploma at Nottingham University.

 

Zohreh Paykani.  Her experience with watercolours is sufficient to allow her to enjoy using colours with lots of water to produce impulsive marks.  Listening to music gives her the excitement and motivation to paint the emotion and movements as she hears it and sees the colours. Spontaneous sketches are initially in watercolour, which are then painted in different media and surfaces.

 

Pat Rhodes.  After a career in teaching Pat decided to return to her interest in art and design before it was too late.  Her work centres on the use of logos and branding to promote religious and secular icons using ceramics to explore the theme.

 

Sally Shillito  has always liked life drawing and portraiture, and has lately become interested in painting trees and trying to express the different atmospheres they create.  The ongoing sale of the old family house in the countryside, surrounded by trees past and present and a large rambling garden, has given a new depth and scope to this project.

 

Chrissie Soames.  Having experienced working life in central London in the colourful 1960’s as a window dresser and freelance photographer, Chrissie has chosen to explore an earlier darker era.  Her work draws on her memories of childhood spent in Pimlico in the 1950’s.  She has used personally evocative images and sounds from those formative years to illustrate a cathartic journey into her past.

 

 

Putney School of Art and Design offers high quality learning opportunities in the visual arts.  It seeks to enable students to realise their creative potential in a flexible way, enabling them to fruitfully progress as artists. The Art and Design Diploma provides specialist, structured study for students of contemporary fine art. Whilst giving a grounding in the core elements of fine art and design practice, the course encourages experimentation and allows for the exploration of a range of media and approaches, giving students the opportunity to develop their interests and their artistic “voice”.

 

 

 

"UNTITLED" EXHIBITION - 08 June 2012

Studio106 Art Gallery has great pleasure to invite you to

“Untitled” exhibition.

 

UNTITLED

6st – 20th Jun 2012

 

Artist Participating:

 

Joanne Brenan

Luke Beachey

Pato Bosich

Mirjana Marsenic

Caroline Cary

Susan Eyre

Madeleine Burt

 

Joanne Brennan’s work is an exploration into the ways materials can capture and embody the previously hidden qualities of light.  She projects light through material and takes an image of the resulting projection which is then digitally reproduced; she calls this ‘drawing with light’.

 

Pato Bosich was born in Chile, but left for Europe in 1997. He has lived and worked in Germany, parts of central and Eastern Europe, before settling in London in 2000.  He has served as the artist in Residence in The Muse Gallery, London and The Museum of Modern Art, Chiloe, Chile.  He exhibits his work globally.  His paintings resist easy readings, instead convey mystery and tension, as the viewer is denied the whole story and can only see a snapshot of psychological drama without the proper context.

 

Caroline Cary lives and works in London and Southern Spain.  She works in many different mediums, having begun her career in landscapes and figures, she has moved towards abstraction and to experimental work on Perspex. Cary has been showing her work professionally since the 1970´s in both group and Solo Shows. She has shown in London, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Nairobi, including, the Jonathon Poole Gallery, Sue Rankin Gallery, Austin Desmond Galler (Devon), Christopher Hull gallery, Gordon Hepworth Gallery, Studio 106 Art Gallery, The New Grafton Gallery and The Piers Feetham Gallery to name  but a few, and in Spain, Gran Capitan Granada, Houses of Art Gallery, Marbella and in various venues organised by Stephen Howes. She has been represented at most London Art Fairs, The Art Fair Islington, Chelsea Art Fair, Art on Paper at the Royal College, The Affordable Art Fare and Art London.

 

Susan Eyre explores idealistic fantasies in an urban reality, through her work with screen printing and digital technologies in various media, both 2D and 3D.    She focuses on the human desire for perfect and the illusions we create. She graduated from Goldsmiths with a BA(Hons) in Textiles in 2007 and has displayed her work all over London and the UK.

 

Luke Beachey was born in Cardiff and recently graduated from Brighton University.  He has participated in several group shows in Brighton and Lewes.  His work is concerned with disembodied erotic entropy and the removal of social conventions and a person’s regression to a primitive being.

 

Mirjana Marsenic is a Montenegrin artist, currently living and studying for her MA in Pont-Aven, France.  Amongst other awards, she was received the ZAMTES institute of International Relations and Corporation Best Student Award in 2009. Her paintings are intended to stop modern man for a moment, separating him from his everyday obligations and pressures and allow him to see what goes unseen.

 

Madeleine Burt lives and works in Nottingham, she regularly exhibits nationally and internationally, her most recent shows have been in Berlin and London.  She is artist in residence at Nottingham Trent University. Her work explores themes of separation, loss and preservation. In her latest series of work, she comments on these areas by looking at traditional lace production and moth specimens, an insect associated with the destruction of fabric.

 

 

If you did not have a chance to view a beautiful works of this artist, at the beginning of the 2012, you are having an opportunity now, from 6st to 20th Jun 2012.

 

Gallery is open on Tuesday,

Wednesday and Friday from 12 – 6pm.

Lottery-black

Luke Beachey's solo exhibition: Submission - coming of age - 04 -21 April, 2012

SUBMISSION - COMING OF AGE

Luke Beachey 

Submissions – Coming of Age

5th – 21st April 2012

Please join us for a Private View on the 4th April 6.30pm

 

Gallery opening hours are: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 12-6pm and by appointment.

 

“One is frequently under the impression that these (often vast), deterritorialized maps of human desire are birthed with the voracious insistence of a volcano erupting or a star dying, a surge that belies the evident craft Beachey has honed to ‘enable’ such a violent breach of the surface.” Nick Hudson*

 

Beachey’s work concerns the notion of disembodied erotic entropy, severing personal social conditioning, in order to create a form that manifests a singular, all encompassing state of eroticised being. By removing the social constructions that have been placed in accordance to his own interpretation of the human body means he needs to create his own visually destructive Thanatos to keep the erotic Eros balanced. When delving into these physical states of being, he has allowed a disembodiment of the person, creating its own entropy in the process. The erotic state he wants is one that transgresses the personal identity trappings and lives as an untainted primal life force.

“A lot of these recent works concern the idea of re-contextualising masculine identity via scenes of ritualistic disembodiment. I feel the need to represent this transition of the masculine to the third gender by allowing physical representations of fluxing fragility and its relationship with masculinity in regards to the instability of the masculine heteronormative gender binary scaffolding, especially in regards to the process experienced by someone when coming of age”. Luke Beachey

 

Luke Beachey was born in Cardiff, Wales. He studied Fine Art Painting at Brighton University during which time he participated in various exhibitions alongside other artists. Amongst these shows, were successful exhibitions such as Third of the Way and Stellar in Brighton and one successful show at The Foundry in Lewes. Since the completion of his degree in the summer of 2011 he has continued to make work for various commissions. Luke participated in U-N-F-O-R-E-S-E-E-N? You Tell Us! exhibition, held in the Studio106 Art Gallery, in February 2012.

 

 

 

Luke Beachey welcomes commissions.

 

Cary & Webb 2012 - CLOUDY RIVER

CLOUDY RIVER

February 22, 2012 at 7:00pm until March 3, 2012 at 6:00pm

 

“These are artists that keep you guessing. Their new directions are never a random decision, but always come from a deep knowledge of their individual and joint practices. There’s a joy in the doing and yet a profound underlying seriousness to the play.” Simon Holt, Composer.

 

Caroline Cary and Jim Webb have joined forces to produce Cloudy River, an innovative installation, combining the traditional medium of painting with the technological advances in the use of Laser Light. Cary&Webb are creating a world of light and colour, a lake and waterfalls of deep blue, to immerse yourself in, fashioned from lasers. Swirling smoke drifts in and out of a sculptural construction of painted Perspex. The all-encompassing sight and sound is a mind expanding and emotionally moving experience. The experiments with the lasers is an attempt to use light as a three dimensional tool, using light as another way of exploring pictorial space.

 

Cary&Webb have been collaborating for four years; Cloudy River represents a major extension of their technological and artistic partnership. They produced a highly successful installation, Horizon, in Docklands in 2009, which is now to be followed by another, unusual and exciting installation for Studio 106 Art Gallery. The installation is designed to open our sensibilities to a whole new area of visual awareness, appealing to all manner and ages of persons from art lovers and students of technology to toddlers paddling in the river.

 

Caroline Cary lives and works in London and Southern Spain. She works in many different mediums, having begun her career in landscapes and figures, she has moved towards abstraction and to experimental work on Perspex. Cary has been showing her work professionally since the nineteen seventies in both group and Solo Shows. She has shown in London, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Nairobi, including, the Jonathon Poole Gallery, Sue Rankin Gallery, Austin Desmond Gallery, Christopher Hull gallery, Gordon Hepworth Gallery, Studio 106 Art Gallery, The New Grafton Gallery and The Piers Feetham Gallery to name but a few, and in Spain, Gran Capitan Granada, and in various other Spanish venues. She has been represented at most London Art Fairs, The Art Fair Islington, Chelsea Art Fair, Art on Paper at the Royal College, The Affordable Art Fare and Art London.

 

Jim Webb is a well known laser performer who lives and works primarily in London. Webb’s current work consists of redefining the public visual perception of lasers by use of techniques never used before and producing a visual experience which combines a fresh wonder of laser light with interactive elements that allow the viewer to modify their experience.

He has exhibited globally from the late seventies, until today. He was responsible for setting up Holographic Studios at the Liverpool College

of Art and the Royal College of Art in London. Webb developed new photographic techniques in “integrated transience”. He has worked in television worldwide, including BBC Horizon, QED and various SciFi Series, as well as educational programmes and game shows. He has created live laser performances for musical events varying from rock to electronica to techno, both in the UK and abroad and performances with dancers from Western classical to Eastern traditional. He has created a variety of installations in many environments ranging from galleries to forests. He has also been influential within the development of innovative control and display techniques for use with lasers.

 

 

u-n-f-o-r-s-E-E-n? you tell us! - Group exhibition 2012

GROUP EXHIBITION

OPEN ENTRY EXHIBITION

U-N-F-O-R-E-S-E-E-N? You Tell Us!

 

20th January – 10th February

Please join us for a Private View: Thursday 19th January 2012, 6:30pm

Gallery open: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 12pm to 6pm and by appointment.

 

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortals ever dared to dream before; The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

 

Featuring 13 artists from around the globe, ranging from the newly graduated to the more firmly established; Studio 106 Art Gallery is delighted to announce an Open Entry Exhibition; U-N-F-O-R-E-S-E-E-N? You Tell Us!

 

The artists all explored the theme of the Unforeseen, the resulting show displays their differing interpretations of the hidden, secretive nature of people, things in nature and the physical world that we do not see, and what is neither obvious nor planned. The exhibition features sculpture, paintings with oil, acrylic, resin and gloss, photography, video installation, digital prints and ink.

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery is a Not-for-profit organisation that provides a platform to explore, create and present contemporary art and new forms of expression. Focusing on researching and developing collaborative processes intrinsic to art-making, generating dialogues across: generations, cultures, and the bond between art and the audience, Studio 106 Art Gallery programmes Live Art, exhibitions, screenings, forums, artists’ talks and workshops.

 

 

Pato Bosich

Luke Beachey

Susan Eyre

Scott Sharp

Eeva-Mari Haikala

Madeleine Burt

Sophie Morgan

Davide Maione

Joanne Brennan

Ruth Geldard

Madi Acharya-Baskerville

David McLeavy

Mirjana Marsenic

 

Joanne Brennan’s work is an exploration into the ways materials can capture and embody the previously hidden qualities of light.  She projects light through material and takes an image of the resulting projection which is then digitally reproduced; she calls this ‘drawing with light’.

 

Pato Bosich was born in Chile, but left for Europe in 1997. He has lived and worked in Germany, parts of central and Eastern Europe, before settling in London in 2000.  He has served as the artist in Residence in The Muse Gallery, London and The Museum of Modern Art, Chiloe, Chile.  He exhibits his work globally.  His paintings resist easy readings, instead convey mystery and tension, as the viewer is denied the whole story and can only see a snapshot of psychological drama without the proper context.

 

Caroline Cary lives and works in London and Southern Spain.  She works in many different mediums, having begun her career in landscapes and figures, she has moved towards abstraction and to experimental work on Perspex. Cary has been showing her work professionally since the 1970´s in both group and Solo Shows. She has shown in London, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Nairobi, including, the Jonathon Poole Gallery, Sue Rankin Gallery, Austin Desmond Galler (Devon), Christopher Hull gallery, Gordon Hepworth Gallery, Studio 106 Art Gallery, The New Grafton Gallery and The Piers Feetham Gallery to name  but a few, and in Spain, Gran Capitan Granada, Houses of Art Gallery, Marbella and in various venues organised by Stephen Howes. She has been represented at most London Art Fairs, The Art Fair Islington, Chelsea Art Fair, Art on Paper at the Royal College, The Affordable Art Fare and Art London.

 

Susan Eyre explores idealistic fantasies in an urban reality, through her work with screen printing and digital technologies in various media, both 2D and 3D.    She focuses on the human desire for perfect and the illusions we create. She graduated from Goldsmiths with a BA(Hons) in Textiles in 2007 and has displayed her work all over London and the UK.

 

Luke Beachey was born in Cardiff and recently graduated from Brighton University.  He has participated in several group shows in Brighton and Lewes.  His work is concerned with disembodied erotic entropy and the removal of social conventions and a person’s regression to a primitive being.

 

Mirjana Marsenic is a Montenegrin artist, currently living and studying for her MA in Pont-Aven, France.  Amongst other awards, she was received the ZAMTES institute of International Relations and Corporation Best Student Award in 2009. Her paintings are intended to stop modern man for a moment, separating him from his everyday obligations and pressures and allow him to see what goes unseen.

 

Madeleine Burt lives and works in Nottingham, she regularly exhibits nationally and internationally, her most recent shows have been in Berlin and London.  She is artist in residence at Nottingham Trent University. Her work explores themes of separation, loss and preservation. In her latest series of work, she comments on these areas by looking at traditional lace production and moth specimens, an insect associated with the destruction of fabric.

 

U-N-F-O-R-E-S-E-E-N? You Tell Us! Is part of Pivotal Shifts, a project supported by

The Arts Council, England, London.

BENJAMIN SENIOR - 2011

BREATHLESS - BENJAMIN SENIOR - 2011

12th May 2011 – 28th May 2011

Private View: Wednesday 11th of May

Gallery open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday 12.00 to 18.00

Event: Children’s egg tempera Workshop 

 

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery is delighted to announce Breathless, a solo exhibition by artist Benjamin Senior.

 

Central to Senior’s practice is a formal play of rhythms, false symmetries and colour relationships. These elements are combined in this new body of work in which he uses physical exercise as a springboard for exploring the connotations of the body fixed within a flattened space.

Representing geometrised figures in the context of sport and exercise allows the artist to indulge both in abstract pattern and the rendering of the human body. In Senior’s work, the body becomes a formal matter, reduced to a rhythmic play between convexity and flatness against a patterned background.

Small-scale canvasses are used to reinforce the attention of the viewer to the meanings of geometry and symmetry of the bodies that often seems to interact with the space around them.

References for his imagery can be found in the figurative stylization of the 1920’s and 30’s. By turning this historicized lens on the contemporary culture of bodily wellbeing and regimented exercise, as Senior touches upon binaries of the natural and the unnatural, the collective and the individual, the healthy and the unhealthy.

 

Viewers of Senior’s work can also sense the artist’s enjoyment of control – over the exacting medium of egg tempera; over the configuration of the body; and over the system of hard-edged colours and shapes that characterise his work. With a surgical precision and wry humour, Senior probes ambiguous areas of our notion of healthy lifestyle, ideal beauty and visual pleasure.

Does Breathless imply exercise or stillness? By placing an emphasis on observational drawing rather than photography as the preparation for painting, Senior strives to directly capture certain effects of nature – a particular quality of light, the warmth beneath the skin. Senior’s paintings are strongly inflicted by everyday observations, and yet amplify the numeric and geometric nature of our everyday perception.

The outcomes of Senior’s practice are familiar and at the same time quietly perplexing images. They invite us to draw closer to the works and ruminate over these paradoxes and contradictions.

 

Benjamin Senior. Lives and works in London. Senior graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2010.  Currently he is a resident artist at the Kingsgate Workshops Trust in London. Recent exhibitions include The Fort Painting Show at Fort, London, The Future Can Wait, Shoreditch Town Hall, London, Polemically Small, Charlie Smith London, and the 2010 Studio Voltaire Members Exhibition, selected by Jennifer Higgie and Rebecca Warren, London. www.benjaminsenior.com

Image Credits

Top: Benjamin Senior – Stretches / 2010

Left Bottom: Benjamin Senior – Hydra / 2010

Right Bottom: Benjamin Senior – Equilibrium/ 2010

MIRIAM AUSTIN - 2011

MIRIAM AUSTIN

31st March 2011 – 30th April 2011

Private View: Wednesday 30th of March

Gallery open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday 12.00 to 18.00

Matthew Drage In conversation with Miriam King on Thursday, 7th April, 7pm.

 

‘I seek a resolution between the transient and transcendent, between the personal and the collective.’ Helen Chadwick

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery is delighted to announce the first solo exhibition of artist Miriam Austin.

There are times when physical sensation carries with it an acutely and incontrovertibly personal intimacy. In these moments one might begin to doubt whether experience, in its most basic form, can ever really be shared. Miriam Austin’s sculpture seeks to persuade us that such doubts should be set aside; that those feelings which seem beyond the understanding of others are in fact the lifeblood of humanity’s ability to commune.

 

In her work, Austin consistently sacrifices resolution and finality to the demands of sensitivity. She moves with delicate ambivalence between sculpture, performance, and installation. Drawing on materials (physical and phenomenal) so fragile that the slightest clumsiness on her part will cause them to disperse, shatter or decompose, Austin spins a loose and tender web. In it she traps the elements of the corporeal which are foundational in their emotional significance, but which, precisely because of the depth of their significance, evade easy expression.

 

Austin’s sculptures, like that which drives their inception, are transitory in the extreme. They require, even after installation, the artist’s constant ministration. Fine clay cracks; oil and egg yolk run; mingle and spoil; fruit rots – and all of this for the briefest moment of balance and harmony. She does all this not simply to present us with our scrutiny or delectation. Rather, with an urgency driven by the fleeting beauty of what she has found, she builds for us a distinct and protective realm of the emotional, the sensual and the visceral. The waxy materiality of the work, with its fatty deposits, its uncanny nods towards filmic heartache, its emotive theatricality, is as much a ladder for the viewer to climb as it is a thing for him to view. It allows passage to a wilderness of the unconscious whose nature Austin sketches as half-living forms caught between barrenness and fecundity; as the secretions of ripe bodies all the riper for their closeness to death; as the impotent movements of desire and hope common to everything which has the capacity to breed.

Austin’s sculpture might be thought of as a kind of shadow play. Its material, formal and symbolic properties are devices – narrative, performative, psycho-suggestive – used to give rise to a suspension of disbelief; even to something akin to hypnotic trance. One or the other is necessary if the viewer is to be sufficiently disinhibited and rendered vulnerable enough to give, in viewing, that which Austin has given in making.

At the centre of Austin’s work lies a vantage point. From it, we are invited to look out over a brightly illuminated landscape with an unearthly compassion for life in all its virulence. This is a compassion grounded in the fragment of doctrine which pervades everything that Austin makes: if it were not for the existence of the world in its entirety – if it were not for the endlessly repeating cycles of tension and release, suffering and pleasure, death and rebirth – compassion would simply not be possible.

*Studio 106 Art Gallery would like to thank Matthew Drage for writing the press release.

 

Miriam Austin lives and works in London. Austin is currently studying toward an MA in Sculpture at the Royal College of Art, London. Recent exhibitions include, The Devil’s Necktie, The Woodmill, London, 2010; Blood and Time, Project Space at the Woodmill, London, 2010; In which the woman was dead from the cold, XVIII Jesus Lane, Cambridge; 2009; On Air, Christ’s College Visual Arts Centre, The University of Cambridge, 2009, The Dying Animal, The Shop, Cambridge, 2009, The Space Between, Bharat Nivas, Auroville, India, 2008.

 

Matthew Drage is an artist and writer living in East London. After completing a BA in Philosophy and an MPhil in the History & Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge, Drage moved to London to focus on his fine art practice. He is the co-founder and current co-director of Copenhagen Place, an independent, non-commercial gallery and studio project in Limehouse.

 

 

JULIEN TIBERI – DOUBLEBACK ALLEY - 2011

JULIEN TIBERI – DOUBLEBACK ALLEY

24th June 2011 – 16th July 2011

Private View: Thursday 23 June 2011, 6:30pm

Gallery open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday 12.00 to 18.00

 

What happens if our cultural recycling begins to overtake us and starts reviving events that have not even taken place yet? “

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery is delighted to present Doubleback Alley, the first solo exhibition in London of French artist Julien Tiberi.

 

Julien Tiberi leads us along winding paths where cultural referents and graphic practices are constantly subtly interwoven. Choosing drawing as his preferred medium, the artist offers us a pictorial universe nurtured by literary works, ranging from Mark Twain to G.K. Chesterton by way of Robert A. Heinlein.

 

Presented here in a new enhanced version, L’histoire véritable [True Story] consists of a set of views of a fictitious exhibition, imagined in its entirety by Julien Tiberi. These drawings illustrate a text by Lucian of Samosata written in the 2nd century. Regarded as the first science-fiction story, this utopian — but also caricatural — tale is used as a pretext by the artist to confront various problem areas, including the setting up of a collective exhibition, documentary photography, and the figure of the curator.

 

Beyond the simple updating of a caricature that comes from the past, this work reflects the analytical practice Julien Tiberi operates with: the references he catalogues are transformed into theatrical figures through drawing.

*(Author:) Marc Bembekoff, curator, Palais de Tokyo

 

Julien Tiberi (born 1979, Marseille) works and lives in Paris. Solo exhibitions include L’amicale Des Tours De Main Hors Classe, Palais De Tokyo , Paris (2011); Le catalogue, Galerie Florence Loewy, Paris (2011); Stratos Fear, Galerie RLBQ, Marseille (2008); Julien Tiberi, Kunstklub, Berlin (2005). Recent Group shows include Ne jamais remettre à demain ce que l’on peut faire à une seule, (cur. Julien Nédélec) La Graineterie, Houilles Paris (2011); Le carillon de Big Ben, Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry (2010); One more reality, Careof, DOCVA La Fabbrica del Vapore, Milan, Italie (2010); Dead Letters Office, Centre de lettre perdue, touring to Saint-Paul, Minnesota and Atlanta, USA (2008); Mail Delivery System, Mailer Daemon (cur. Galerie RLBQ), Contemporary Art Museum, Marseille (2007).

 

For more information, visit: http://documentsdartistes.org/artistes/tiberi/Tiberi-web.pdf

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery is a Not-for-profit organisation, that combines a professional gallery with a lively education programme, presenting a regular series of exhibitions and events that complement and enrich its programme of courses and workshops. We would like to thank the Arts Council England, London for supporting this exhibition.

CLARA CLARK – EYELIES - 2011

CLARA CLARK – EYELIES

22nd September 2011 – 22nd  October 2011

Private View: Wednesday 21 September 2011, 6:30pm

Gallery open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday 12.00 to 18.00

 

And if from the point of view of the human eye, montage is undoubtedly a construction, from the point of view of another eye, it ceases to be one; it is the purest vision of a non-human eye, of an eye which would be in things

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery is delighted to announce Eyelies, a solo exhibition by artist Clara Clark.

 

Eyelies explores discrepancies between perception and reality, i.e. the building of a construct in the viewer’s mind and the mechanism of the making. The newly made sculptures were developed from an ongoing investigation into the way darkness can create the illusion of vast space.

 

Clark is fascinated by a theory on perception and representation. Because the world presents the brain with too much visual information to absorb at once, most of what we see is actually made up. Only taking in a small percentage, the brain fills in the gaps with what is expected.

 

Clark’s work is articulated around the subsequent idea that if the main visual elements of an easily recognised phenomenon are recreated, a convincing image will manifest itself in one’s mind, despite obvious signs of artificiality.

 

The viewer hence feels a sense of spatial reorientation and transportation away from the exhibition setting into a kind of other world, absorbing an alternative order of things.

 

Yet, these illusions are never fully convincing. Both makeshift and extravagant, the actual materiality that creates the imaginary scene, blights it almost immediately as the viewer differentiates the real from the imaginary. In fine, this paradoxical relationship is central to the process and of the work.

 

Mechanics and practical features are an inherent and visible part of the external structure, allowing viewers to see how it operates, building an interesting juxtaposition between the materiality of the form and the wistful illusion it creates.

 

Using DIY methods and ad hoc materials to replicate the main visual information, Clark constructs viewpoints of cities, outer space, the sea, rolling hills etc. Suddenly and only momentarily, one finds oneself in an unexpected predicament, stranded in the middle of the ocean or standing on a narrow ramp thousands of feet above a city.

 

Clara Clark lives and works in London. Solo exhibitions include ‘Through The looking’, The Sassoon Gallery, London March 2007  ‘Re-Creation’, Standpoint Gallery, September 2008, London (Mark Tanner Sculpture Prize Winner’s Exhibition); Space Ship’, The Salt Gallery, , March 2008, Cornwall. Group shows include Echoes of Other Worlds, The Stables Gallery, (Orleans Park), October 2010, London. Shoehorn, Crimestown Gallery, March 2009, London. Clara Clark graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2010.

 

http://www.claraclark.co.uk/ www.studio106artgallery.org

Eyelies is part of Pivotal Shifts, a project supported by The Arts Council England, London.

 

ME AND THE MACHINE - Deadlock - 2011

ME AND THE MACHINE - DEADLOCK

4th and 5th of November 2011 Gallery opens 12.00 to 18.00

“We have a world of pleasures to win and nothing to lose but boredom”

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery is delighted to announce Deadlock, a new multimedia performative installation by artist group Me and the Machine.

 

Me and the Machine work ranges from wearable videos to participative cinema screenings, one-to-one performance, immersive dance installations, research projects and an online platform for the anonymous exchange of secrets. Audiences are invited to engage performatively in these unique experiences, being dislocated into hybrid realms, somewhere in between reality and fiction.

 

Deadlock is an absurd riddle, a never-ending discussion between two contemporary souls, locked between the soft numbness of comfort and their paralyzing fear to escape it, to open the door that keeps them in.

 

You can hear them, you can see them, you can feel them knocking, remote and actual, asking for your help, but will you be able to help? Do you even want to help?

 

Deadlock is a new development of Me and the Machine’s Door Project, a series of site-responsive kinetic video installations on the inside of locked doors. Using commonplace audiovisual technology, these sculptural works explore human hesitation, isolation and interconnection in the hyper-networked world, and the illusion of insurmountable physical proximity and impossible intimacy between the individuals, the two humans, on ‘each side of the door’.

 

Based on a true story – does it ring a bell?

 

Me and the Machine was initiated by artists Sam Pearson and Clara García Fraile. Their works range from wearable videos to participative cinema screenings, one-to-one performance, immersive dance installations, research projects and an online platform for the anonymous exchange of secrets. They combine innovative uses of everyday audiovisual technology and interactive media with choreographed performance, evocative text and distinctive imagery.

 

Audiences are invited to engage performatively in these unique experiences, being dislocated into hybrid realms, somewhere in between reality and fiction.
Clara García Fraile and Sam Pearson met while studying Performance and Visual Art at the University of Brighton, where they graduated in 2008 with First Class Honours. Since then, their works have toured Europe and the UK, drawing support from Blast Theory, South East Dance, The Basement and Battersea Arts Centre, amongst other organisations.

 

The company obtained The Arches Brick Award 2010 in Edinburgh for their “experimental and risk-taking approach”, a nomination for a Total Theatre Award and the ‘Outstanding Artist Award’ and ‘First Prize in Performance’ in the Young Artists Awards 2010 and 2009 of Junta de Castilla y Leon (Spain). They were also selected to be part of the British Council Edinburgh Showcase 2011 and to represent the UK in the Biennial of Young Artists of Europe and the Mediterranean 2011.

www.meandthemachine.co.uk

 

Studio106 Art Gallery is a Not-for-profit organisation that provides a platform to explore, create and present contemporary art and new forms of expression. We focus on researching and developing collaborative processes inherent to art-making and generating dialogues across: generations, cultures, and the relationship between art and the audience. Studio 106 Art Gallery programmes Live Art, exhibitions, screenings, forums, artists’ talks and workshops.

 

Deadlock is part of Pivotal Shifts, a project supported by The Arts Council England, London.

 

 

BANDING THE BOUNDARIES - 2011

BANDING THE BOUNDARIES

21st July 2011 – 6th August 2011

Private View: Wednesday 20th July 2011, 6.30pm
Gallery open: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays 12.00pm to 18.00pm

 

ARTISTS: Jay Newell, Alice Moorey, Ralph Raposas, Charlotte Blamey, Marnie Davies, Kemi Sanbe, Lucy Pidgeon, Miriam Austin, Adam Knight, Victoria Jackson, Jeremy Danziger, Sam Jarman and Laura-Jade Holloway, Diana Bradford Arnold, James Miles, Florence Bartlett.

 

Studio106 Art Gallery is delighted to invite you to Banding The Boundaries, the second exhibition curated with the University For The Creative Arts, Epsom.

 

Showing in parallel, outstanding graduates’ work alongside their tutors’ work, Banding the Boundaries challenges and questions creative processes and the relationship between those who facilitate and those who participate in learning. Encouraging dialogue, this exhibition questions both individual practices and examines the shifting relationship between teacher and student. Collaboration in art allows participants to open up imaginative processes, and to mark a critical discourse in individual and collective practices.

Banding The Boundaries aims to create an encounter for young and established artists working in diverse artistic disciplines as they become a collective, bound together by constructing and deconstructing the ideas around what something is and what something can be.

Using models of an experimental art school, a workshop led by the students for their tutors will be organised throughout the exhibition; all artists involved become boundless in their creativity and generate a sense of unification between energy and aesthetics.

The importance of Banding The Boundaries is particularly relevant today. The increasing professionalisation of art and the current issues with access to art education makes this initiative meaningful. Re-assessing methodologies in art education highlights the incommensurable importance of dialogue between academics, students and society.

 

Miriam Austin

Currently studying towards an MA in Sculpture at the Royal College of Art, Austin works with sculpture, performance and video to create process-based installations that explore notions of embodiment and inter-subjectivity. Much of her work emerges from an investigation into the live quality of organic materials.

 

Adam Knight

His current work is interested in a dialectic engagement that oscillates between what constitutes a work’s question and answer. Forms are realised through images being somewhere between words and objects, sounds and solidified things, simultaneously covered-up and revealed.

 

Victoria Jackson

Jackson is an interdisciplinary artist with a background in Fine Art and Graphic Design, specialising in Video and Sound. Collaboration is intrinsic to both her creative and teaching practice and reflects her interest in place and its relationship to people.

 

Jeremy Danziger 

For Danziger as a sculptor, drawing is an essential means of enquiry, not only into the manipulation of form and space but also as a means of discovery within itself. The beauty of drawing is that it defies conventions of classification and as such sets the spirit free.

 

Statement from Sam Jarman and Laura-Jade Holloway – Here and Now

Jarman and Holloway’s work is a collaboration that embraces notions of connectivity, disagreement, negotiation and critique of experience.

Their interests rely on the confines of varying situations, the endurance experienced, and the testing of limitations in terms of personal and social boundaries, linking further to notions of ownership and authorship and the idea of institutional restraint versus the freedom of working in an informal space.

 

 

Banding the Boundaries is part of Pivotal Shifts, a project supported by The Arts Council England, London.

 

MAUD TRAON – HOME SWEET HOME - 2011

MAUD TRAON – HOME SWEET HOME

18th November 2011 – 17th December 2011

Private View: Thursday 17th November  2011, 6:30pm

Gallery open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday 12.00 to 18.00

 

 

« Le médium lui-même n’est plus saisissable en tant que tel, et la confusion du médium et du message est la première grande formule de cette ère nouvelle. “

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery is delighted to announce the first solo exhibition of Maud Traon, Home Sweet Home.

 

Maud Traon’s work develops fantasy aethetcis, creating a confusion between fiction and reality. De facto, she challenges and transgresses widely accepted  ideas in art. This show marks a significant shift between her crafts practice (Traon is an established jewellery maker) to Visual Art.

 

Maud Traon’s work has never fit comfortably in either contexts, whilst always leading her viewers to unexpected outcomes.

 

Finding our way through a dedalic language made of  an intense, almost suffocating, use of  colours,  glitter, images, and ideas., and following details in this mountain of meaning and objects, is the only way to make sense of the work.

 

Traon’s viewers’ journey is literally about looking for a needle in a haystack, with the exciting possibility of actually finding a treasure.

 

The exuberant visual and conceptual language is an attempt to conceal what obsseses her, what attracts her, and allows her to be creative. Indeed, far from populist artists trying to give instant meaning with an instant coffee taste, she gives a new role to the viewer, compelling them to decipher her work. Surely ambiguous, the newly-made installations mixe popular  references such as tourists glorifications – fake snow balls or magnets depicting monuments- along with philosophical and aesthetics theories, clearly referencing Virilio, Baudrillard and Deleuze… For instance, relating the “visual universe” of pizza Flyers to Renaissance Matthias Grunenwald’s Retable of Issenheim.

 

Through a poignant and colourful aesthetics of fairy tales, Traon narrates a story  of psychological anxieties and a need for immediate beauty consumption. Singular and universal, her rich visual and intellectual imaginary guides us through a personal and dazing  journey.

 

With Home Sweet Home, Traon finds her way back to childhood; at the same time,  she conveys an infatuation for bright colours, made up characters, objects and playful games. On the other hand, she expresses a sweet and naive need for bewilderment. Framed by a childish yet complex intellectual rigour, she asks and asks again: What does it mean, daddy?

 

Maud Traon lives and works in London. Traon’s work explores the relationship between the reality of the world we live in and the signs and symbols that actually represent it.

Unusual scales and overlapping references from both the worlds of crafts and Visual arts show her fascination about consumerism, mainstream and kitsch visual universes.

Home Sweet Home is part of Pivotal Shifts, a project supported by The Arts Council England, London.

 

A SOLITARY OCCUPATION - LEAH LOVETT - 2010

A SOLITARY OCCUPATION - LEAH LOVETT

10th December 2010 – 16th January 2011

Private View: Thursday 9th of December 

Gallery open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday 12.00 to 18.00

(gallery closed 23 Dec – 4 Jan 2011)

Leah Lovett in conversation with Natalie Kay: Thursday 13th January 2011 7pm 

 

 

He wondered if he had it in him to write without a pen, if he could learn to speak instead, filling the darkness with his voice, speaking the words into the air, into the walls, into the city …”

Paul Auster, City of Glass.

 

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery is delighted to announce the first solo exhibition of artist and writer Leah Lovett.

 

Leah Lovett’s work often consists in constructing spectacles of the urban realm; working across a range of disciplines, her practice has two complementary parts which are interconnected and mutually feed off and inform one another.

 

Lovett devises performances that are often acted out by others and which can be imperceptible to her audiences, and recorded with a camera. The resulting works highlights the artist’s occupation of different types of urban space explore and restage dramas of power and agency staged within the city.

 

The works presented here relate to the notion of territory, and in particular the cross over between theatrical display and the display of power. Temporality – which is likewise central to Lovett’s process of working – is explored formally through sequences, and repetition of patterns, capturing lightly, visible changes.

 

It is intended that the act of standing with the camera is first and foremost a performance – a visible, durational occupation of a public space within which the camera acted simultaneously as frame and framing device; the videographic and photographic body of works interestingly mirror the invisible presence of the photographer-performer. This is particularly striking with the series of photographs ‘Day Of Celebration, Site of Protest’, which depicts Lovett’s occupation of a symbolic space and time in Seoul. Standing for 12 hours in a cold winter day and capturing images of an empty scene, Lovett’s active presence re-enacts political actions, i.e. Korean crowds gathering to stand against USA interventionism on domestic governance in South Korea. Yet, Lovett is clearly less interested in re-creating an active act of protest per se and explores instead the idea of protest and occupation. Her hidden presence thus becomes overwhelming, whilst her camera witnesses a  visual quietness, and the absence of anticipated movements of crowds.

 

A Solitary Occupation also features drawings, which both support and further the work as “a kind of conversation with [the artist’s] imagination, and often the first manifestation of [her] future performances”.

 

Leah Lovett lives and works in London. She has shown her work widely in the UK and internationally. Past exhibitions and projects include Sexuate Subjects, UCL (London 2010), Whitstable Biennale (2010), Testing Grounds, South Hill Park (Bracknell 2009), Bilateria, Five Hundred Dollars (London 2009), Body Parts III, Royal Scottish Academy (Edinburgh, 2007). Research and residencies include Lab39, Seoul, South Korea (2010), Duveen Travel Scholarship (Brazil, 2009).

 

 

SUMMER TIME LIFE DRAWING - 2010

SUMMER TIME LIFE DRAWING

10 September – 14 September 2010

Private View- 9 September

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery presents an exhibition of life drawing studies created by both the local amateur and professional artists involved in our unique on-going workshop programme.

 

Lead by Chelsea artist and gallerist Simon Tarrant, the workshops place a strong emphasis on the variety of different models studied. The works on display thus reflect this eclectic approach, exploring the diversity of the human anatomy, indiscriminative of age, race and gender.

 

Working from a combination of short and long poses, the artists have produced a provocative body of work, reviving the gallery walls with a varied pace of energetic immediacy and measured contemplation- providing a refreshing take to this traditional genre.

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery’s passion to provide an encouraging environment for creative people through an extensive educational programme has produced an unprecedented opportunity for the artists represented in the show. Through the on-going support and tutelage of the gallery staff, the participants have been afforded an enviable platform for their artistic talents, in the professional art context of an exhibition. Such an approach is unique to Studio 106, highlighting the gallery’s care and attention to emerging artists, providing advice and a critical creative outlet at such a crucial stage in their career. Studio 106 prides itself on being an investor in local talent, allowing artists of all backgrounds and experience to showcase their practice in the intimate and engaging atmosphere of the gallery.

 

Responsible for the hugely successful 2009 pop up gallery Queen’s Elm Artists, a cultural hub providing creative activity for the city, Simon Tarrant is an exciting and highly diverse artist. After receiving great acclaim for this six month gallery project, Tarrant became involved in Studio 106’s workshop programme as an artist tutor. This exhibition utilises Tarrant’s lively approach to both art teaching and practice.

 

 

 

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Suupa Pupa Doompadee Dah! - 2010

Suupa Pupa Doompadee Dah!

In partnership with UCA, Studio 106 Art Gallery has selected works by recent graduates from their final exhibition at UCA, a show that represents the culmination of the year’s study on the Foundation Programme. At an extremely important stage in the students’ professional and personal development, Suupa Pupa Doompadee Dah! aims to support their progression into higher education and ultimately toward a career in the creative arts.

The exhibition brings together works by Laura Alabaf, Esther Chung, Emily Hills, Lewis Ryland, Frances Tomlin, Alexandra Constantine and Amanda Woodcock.

 

The exhibition is directly inspired by the chant of the Oompa Loompa workers of Roald Dahl’s ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’, a story that can be read as an analogy for the trials associated with the coming of age to adulthood. Referencing this period of growth and change, the exhibition aims to highlight the important stage on which the selected artists are embarking. In this vein, the title of the exhibition also refers to the Latin term ‘Pupa’, denoting the chrysalidian process through which insects undergo transformation. These transformative processes are inherently relevant to the work presented, addressing as it does themes of organic process, creativity and change.

 

The selected artists have a polymorphic approach and explore a variety of contemporary media. The works selected are the result of complex and thoughtful investigation into a range of diverse themes such as identity construction, psycho-geography, environmental issues and the body. Encouraging investment in talented young people, Suupa Pupa Doompadee Dah! provides support to these artists at an age when strengthening confidence and establishing support are a crucial part of their future.

 

Studio 106 Art Gallery combines a professional gallery with a lively education programme, presenting a regular series of exhibitions and events that complement and enrich its programme of courses and workshops. Exhibiting work by both young and established artists, Studio 106 Art Gallery aims to provide a supportive and engaging environment in which to work, while helping to establish links between artists, curators and art institutions. The programme of activities offers critical and practical support to artists, whilst providing the audience with an engaging series of events, including exhibitions, screenings, artist talks and Live Art events.

 

 

Tom de Freston 2009 - A Brief History of History Painting

A Brief History of History Painting

27 June to 3 July 2009

 

A Brief History of History Painting focuses on key work by the artist. Faceless figures are seen floating or falling between opposing realms. The poetics of the painting imply that, rather than the specific narrative of an individual, this is the metaphor of a wider human condition.

The exhibition does not look to tie De Freston’s work down to a singular creative vision or painterly type. Instead it embraces diversity, with a firm belief that the works will strike up conversations between themselves, which will be more insightful and accurate than any imposed synopsis.

Other figures (Lovers Discourse) are seen acrobatically flinging themselves across ambiguous stages. The eroticism of their gymnastic energy suggest a mournful dance to an absent other. The melodrama of their plight moves the images towards tragic comedy. Its excessiveness leads us beyond pity. Any pity we do feel is perhaps more aligned to the emptiness and the emotional display.

In Fast Judgement a ‘Welcomer’ draws us in to become spectators of some apocalyptic scene of falling forms. The heroic masculinity of the ‘Welcomer’ is stripped down by his outfit of vibrant boxers and socks. They seem to emasculate him, belying his serious nature and turning him into a figure of ridicule. Along with colouration it seems that emotive oppositions are consciously set up in the image.

Other works make more explicit references to Art History. Danae draws particularly on past types by Rembrandt and Titian. Whilst abstracted the depiction still uses the same narrative devices as its predecessors; namely light, spatial semantics, tone and colouration.

 

Tom de Freston studied Fine Art Ba Hons at LMU before studying History of Art at Cambridge University. Since then he has been exhibiting, teaching and lecturing widely.

Major recent works include the commission of two large scale paintings to be installed behind the altar in Christ’s College Chapel as part of the celebrations to mark the 500th Anniversary of the Chapel’s consecration.

Open Entry exhibition-October 2009

Studio 106 Open

8- 23 October 2009

Open entry exibition

 

Studio 106 Arts Gallery first open exhibition. Displaying the work of six artists working in the UK, the exhibition brought together a range of contemporary approaches to painting. Having collectively exhibited in many of the UK’s major art centers, these artists share a fascination with the natural world and its depiction in the painterly surface.  Presenting images of varying degrees of abstraction, the exhibition offered a series of works that are alive with colour and vivacity, providing insights into the relationship between nature, memory and process.

 

Caroline Cary

Caroline Cary’s work draws on a ‘vast mental archive of images’ generated from years of landscape painting.  Although such work is the starting point for her current painting, her primary concern is to create images that inspire in viewers a heightened awareness of the visual world. Concerned with the relationship between art and music, Cary manipulates colour to create abstract paintings that communicate with often disarming immediacy.

 

Mary Crenshaw

Drawing inspiration from the natural world, Mary Crenshaw creates paintings that sparkle with vivacious energy.  ‘My imagery comes from memory’ she says, and ‘letting the paint take over’.  Researching plants from her immediate surroundings, close observation is transformed by a dynamic gestural style to evoke enticing visions of the world around us.

 

Dawn Latham

Dawn Latham is a local artist who makes landscape paintings with an evocative, nostalgic atmosphere. Reminiscent of scenes from childhood holidays, their palette muted by the passing of time, the images are dream-like. Hovering uncertainly in real space, they act as catalysts for memory and imaginative reflection.

 

Rhonda Whitehead

Nature is the primary source for Rhonda Whitehead’s paintings.  Whether depicting organic form on a microcosmic scale, or the actions of nature on the built environment, her collected works represents a kind of visual biography of continuous landscapes. Revealing patterns and surfaces that are ‘as marked and ambiguous as nature’s chaotic, yet quietly integrative and biotic processes’, these colourful and seductive paintings remind us of the primacy of nature, seeking to capture the universal, ‘the mind that exists in all matter’.

 

Thomas Williams

Thomas Williams creates what he calls ‘deformed paintings’. These abstract images are created through a complex process in which gestural brush strokes are transformed into biomorphic swathes of glistening colour.

 

Claire Wiltsher

Working from what she describes as a ‘rich catalogue of ephemera’ gathered from her journeys around the world, Claire Wiltshire seeks to evoke the energy and atmosphere of places she visits. Concerned with the relationship between abstracted image and the imagination, Claire Wiltshire describes her work as the ‘culmination of thoughts, feelings and the tangible objects that accompany living in unknown fields’.

 

 

 

Caroline Cary Solo Exhibition 2009 -2010

Solo Exhibition

 

October 2009- January 2010

 

Caroline Cary’s work draws on a ‘vast mental archive of images’ generated from years of landscape painting.  Although such work is the starting point for her current painting, her primary concern is to create images that inspire in viewers a heightened awareness of the visual world. Concerned with the relationship between art and music, Cary manipulates colour to create abstract paintings that communicate with often disarming immediacy.

 

Childhood Memory

6th December 2008 – Gallery Opening Show

A collection of artworks by mothers, daughters and sons, highlighting and exploring the differing relationships between mothers and their children.

Childhood and Memories exhibition is celebrating the bond between parent and child, with timeless memories in our minds. The show presents a fusion between different generations of drawings, from parenthood nostalgia, childhood drama through playfully executed moments in time.

The exhibition featured installation by Shian Dora, sculpture by Vera Kovacevska, video clips of fading memories by Snezana Jovanovska, Poem of truth written by Georgia Lewis, Mosaic Plaque by Emma and Reuben Marzalek Gittens, Striking Photography by Cynthia Picard, Sound Mix by Gregory and Neo Mano Epps.